LCSMCHL

Find beauty in banality
Since December 23, 2011.

vimeo:

A meditation on the open road and motorcycles. Plus: FUTURE ISLANDS.

My favorite folk song goes like this, that’s just the main part (Le Hussard de la Garde — The Hussar of the Guard)

Vivre sans soucis
Boire du purin 
Manger d’la merde
C’est le seul moyen
De ne jamais crever de faim
Oh merde, merde divine
Toi seule a des appâts
La rose a des épines
Toi merde, tu n’en as pas
Tu n’en as pas

Now imagine a crowd of over 100 students singing it hahaha glorious. In English it’s like:

Live without worries
Drink manure
Eat shit
It’s the only mean
To never die of hunger
Oh shit, divine shit
Only you has bait
Rose has thorns
You shit, you don’t

Harry. You’re not a bad person. You’re a very good person, who bad things have happened to. Besides, the world isn’t split into good people and Death Eaters. We’ve all got both light and dark inside us. What matters is the part we choose to act on. That’s who we really are. 

(Source: harrypotter.cc, via harrypottergif)

neecygrace:

lcsmchl:

neecygrace:

lcsmchl:

thecelloprincess:

privileged-person:

[Photo: A handicapped placard next to a note which reads: “LAZY ASS. Someone may need this spot. White Trash!]
jesussbabymomma:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

crohns-sucks:
If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.
If you are healthy, please reblog.If you are sick, please reblog.If you have a disability, please reblog.If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.If you are a human being, please reblog.Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 
Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

jesussbabymomma:
I never thought about this wow


I know a girl who goes to my school who is disabled, but you would never be able to tell unless you asked her because she hides it really well. Disabilities aren’t always completely visible.

The point of such spots is to leave space for people to deal with their wheelchair. 

No it’s not. They are planned and constructed that way to accommodate those who are disabled that may use wheelchairs or have lifts, but not for their sole use. If that was the case only people who are in wheelchairs would qualify to get the plate or the placard. The DMV wouldn’t give placards/plates to people that weren’t in wheelchairs if that’s all the spaces were used for.

I wonder what’s the point of having more space than others if you don’t need it for a wheelchair or a lift.

Short answer, it’s the law. Depending on the number of spaces you have to have a certain amount that are handicap and a percentage of those have to be even bigger for van accessibility. It really comes down to the fact that they have a legal standard set for size and spacing because they’re not going to be able to predict what we might need more space for. It may be for a lift, it may be for a wheelchair, it may be to allow somebody to help you maneuver out of the car if you can’t do that on your own, but once you’re standing you can walk with a cane or walker.

Is there a list of disabilities that allow you to use such spots? How is it regulated? I’m pretty sure that’s only for physical disabilities, is that right? 

neecygrace:

lcsmchl:

neecygrace:

lcsmchl:

thecelloprincess:

privileged-person:

[Photo: A handicapped placard next to a note which reads: “LAZY ASS. Someone may need this spot. White Trash!]

jesussbabymomma:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

crohns-sucks:

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.

If you are healthy, please reblog.
If you are sick, please reblog.
If you have a disability, please reblog.
If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.
If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.
If you are a human being, please reblog.

Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 

Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

jesussbabymomma:

I never thought about this wow

I know a girl who goes to my school who is disabled, but you would never be able to tell unless you asked her because she hides it really well. Disabilities aren’t always completely visible.

The point of such spots is to leave space for people to deal with their wheelchair. 

No it’s not. They are planned and constructed that way to accommodate those who are disabled that may use wheelchairs or have lifts, but not for their sole use. If that was the case only people who are in wheelchairs would qualify to get the plate or the placard. The DMV wouldn’t give placards/plates to people that weren’t in wheelchairs if that’s all the spaces were used for.

I wonder what’s the point of having more space than others if you don’t need it for a wheelchair or a lift.

Short answer, it’s the law. Depending on the number of spaces you have to have a certain amount that are handicap and a percentage of those have to be even bigger for van accessibility. It really comes down to the fact that they have a legal standard set for size and spacing because they’re not going to be able to predict what we might need more space for. It may be for a lift, it may be for a wheelchair, it may be to allow somebody to help you maneuver out of the car if you can’t do that on your own, but once you’re standing you can walk with a cane or walker.

Is there a list of disabilities that allow you to use such spots? How is it regulated? I’m pretty sure that’s only for physical disabilities, is that right? 

neecygrace:

lcsmchl:

thecelloprincess:

privileged-person:

[Photo: A handicapped placard next to a note which reads: “LAZY ASS. Someone may need this spot. White Trash!]
jesussbabymomma:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

crohns-sucks:
If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.
If you are healthy, please reblog.If you are sick, please reblog.If you have a disability, please reblog.If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.If you are a human being, please reblog.Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 
Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

jesussbabymomma:
I never thought about this wow


I know a girl who goes to my school who is disabled, but you would never be able to tell unless you asked her because she hides it really well. Disabilities aren’t always completely visible.

The point of such spots is to leave space for people to deal with their wheelchair. 

No it’s not. They are planned and constructed that way to accommodate those who are disabled that may use wheelchairs or have lifts, but not for their sole use. If that was the case only people who are in wheelchairs would qualify to get the plate or the placard. The DMV wouldn’t give placards/plates to people that weren’t in wheelchairs if that’s all the spaces were used for.

I wonder what’s the point of having more space than others if you don’t need it for a wheelchair or a lift.

neecygrace:

lcsmchl:

thecelloprincess:

privileged-person:

[Photo: A handicapped placard next to a note which reads: “LAZY ASS. Someone may need this spot. White Trash!]

jesussbabymomma:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

crohns-sucks:

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.

If you are healthy, please reblog.
If you are sick, please reblog.
If you have a disability, please reblog.
If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.
If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.
If you are a human being, please reblog.

Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 

Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

jesussbabymomma:

I never thought about this wow

I know a girl who goes to my school who is disabled, but you would never be able to tell unless you asked her because she hides it really well. Disabilities aren’t always completely visible.

The point of such spots is to leave space for people to deal with their wheelchair. 

No it’s not. They are planned and constructed that way to accommodate those who are disabled that may use wheelchairs or have lifts, but not for their sole use. If that was the case only people who are in wheelchairs would qualify to get the plate or the placard. The DMV wouldn’t give placards/plates to people that weren’t in wheelchairs if that’s all the spaces were used for.

I wonder what’s the point of having more space than others if you don’t need it for a wheelchair or a lift.

rjtyler:

OPIE, John

English painter (b. 1761, St Agnes, d. 1807, London)

Portrait of Miss Frances Vinicombe
1790s
Oil on canvas, 92 x 71 cm

The Hermitage, St. Petersburg

rjtyler:

OPIE, John

English painter (b. 1761, St Agnes, d. 1807, London)

Portrait of Miss Frances Vinicombe

1790s

Oil on canvas, 92 x 71 cm

The Hermitage, St. Petersburg

thecelloprincess:

privileged-person:

[Photo: A handicapped placard next to a note which reads: “LAZY ASS. Someone may need this spot. White Trash!]
jesussbabymomma:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

crohns-sucks:
If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.
If you are healthy, please reblog.If you are sick, please reblog.If you have a disability, please reblog.If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.If you are a human being, please reblog.Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 
Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

jesussbabymomma:
I never thought about this wow


I know a girl who goes to my school who is disabled, but you would never be able to tell unless you asked her because she hides it really well. Disabilities aren’t always completely visible.

The point of such spots is to leave space for people to deal with their wheelchair. 

thecelloprincess:

privileged-person:

[Photo: A handicapped placard next to a note which reads: “LAZY ASS. Someone may need this spot. White Trash!]

jesussbabymomma:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

crohns-sucks:

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.

If you are healthy, please reblog.
If you are sick, please reblog.
If you have a disability, please reblog.
If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.
If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.
If you are a human being, please reblog.

Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 

Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

jesussbabymomma:

I never thought about this wow

I know a girl who goes to my school who is disabled, but you would never be able to tell unless you asked her because she hides it really well. Disabilities aren’t always completely visible.

The point of such spots is to leave space for people to deal with their wheelchair. 

(via rjtyler)